An astrologer s day summary

Also, in the story he interacts only with two characters: Rather than seek the assistance of the astrologer, Nayak proposes a wager, with the intention of fleecing him.

The dingy lights, often powered by gas, cast a mysterious quality on the astrologer. To add to that is his saffron colored turban and his tilak which are enough to invite the trust of a common man who generally frequents this type of narrow road described in the story.

The combination of holy ash and vermillion on his forehead, the turban on his head, and his whiskers, all taken together, give the impression of a man given to a holy life rather than business.

The Astrologer The two main characters of the story are the astrologer, who is not given a name, and Guru Nayak, the client who turns out to be a former victim, now on a quest for revenge. It is lighted by the sputtering flare of the vendor next door and the lights of the shops nearby. One day, after having finished his daily business, he is about to leave for home when he sees a man close by and hopes to make him a client.

Unlike the astrologer who is described through third-person narrative, Nayak is revealed through his own dialogue. He appears in the story at midpoint, and almost immediately comes across as both aggressive and mean-spirited.

Within the overall structure of the story, it is important for the astrologer to come across as a somewhat mild and inoffensive person who had left his village to escape a life of poverty.

An Astrologer's Day - Summary Summary & Analysis

The writer paints a perfect picture of an astrologer- the con men, the likes of whom we come across in the marketplace and towns.

The language he speaks in English is thus a close approximation of the kind of language he would have used in Tamil. The crafty ways in which the astrologer transcends his work and endeared to his gullible customers is very well described.

To add to that is his saffron colored turban and his tilak which are enough to invite the trust of a common man who generally frequents this type of narrow road described in the story.

The astrologer, realizing that he will most likely be exposed, tries to get out of the deal, but the customer is adamant. The astrologer comes home and tells his wife that a big load was off his mind that day because he had discovered that the man he thought he had murdered years back in his native village and because of whom he had left home, was in fact alive.

Curiously enough, at the end of the exchange, it is the astrologer who wins the sympathy of the reader. But if he goes home, which is a forty-eight-hour train ride north, then Nayak can live well into old age.

The story takes an unexpected turn, when, unbeknownst to the customer, the astrologer recognizes him and tells him about something that happened in the past. Nonetheless, the astrologer comes across as a sharply defined figure, mainly as a result of the assortment of objects he carries with him in order to create the illusion of spirituality and mystical knowledge.

Within the overall structure of the story, it is important for the astrologer to come across as a somewhat mild and inoffensive person who had left his village to escape a life of poverty.

An Astrologer's Day Summary

All that we are told in the beginning of the story is that he had not in the least intended to be an astrologer when he began life. His intuitive understanding of human nature and his wit are crucial to the plot of the story, and the relevance of all the details becomes evident at the end of the story.

His office equipment is comprised of a dozen cowrie shells, a piece of cloth painted with obscure mystic charts, a notebook, and a bundle of palmyra writing.

The position of his eyes between the dazzling forehead and the streaming beard announce his trade to his clients loud and clear. Nothing turns out as we, or the characters, expect. His portrayal as a positive character helps to offset the revelation at the end that he had left the village after having committed a crime.

The man is not trained to become an astrologer and has little knowledge of the stars but he depends solely on his wits, his power of observation and his insight into the human mind.

The man has spread before him his Professional equipment which consists of cowry shellsPalmyra writing and mystic charts which he can not read. Hence, despite the latitude of omniscient narration, the author chooses to let the astrologer remain anonymous.

The author uses irony to show how the science of astrology has been misused by these conmen in the society thereby creating distrust in the people about astrology and astrologers.

Once the astrologer recognizes Nayak, however, he uses the truth to deceive him.

An Astrologer’s Day Summary

The astrologer picks up his things and heads home. The astrologer returns home late to his anxious wife and gives her the money he earned that day, adding that it all came from one client. The narrator notes that the astrologer cannot really tell the future, but he is good at reading people and telling them whatever it is they want to hear; in fact, it only takes him five minutes to deduce if the individual is having issues with love or money.

Fortunately, the astrologer says he was crushed under a bus—it was, in fact, a terrifying death. One day, after having finished his daily business, he is about to leave for home when he sees a man close by and hopes to make him a client.

The bundle of palmyra writing script on the leaves of a palmyra tree in particular lends a very authentic touch, since such writings reflect both wisdom and a high degree of learning. The story builds up certain suspense in the mind of the readers regarding the circumstances that had compelled the protagonist to leave his village all of a sudden without any plan or preparation and take to astrology to eke out a living in the town.

Originally published in Hindi, the piece, along with twenty-nine other short stories by Narayan, was first published in English in The astrologer tells the client that he had been stabbed and pushed into a well presuming he was dead.

The care he takes over his personal appearance is yet another aspect of his charisma.Summary "An Astrologer's Day" has a deceptively simple plot, although the full significance of the story becomes evident only after a second or even third reading.

An Astrologer's Day

An Astrologer's Day is a thriller, suspense short story by author R. K. cheri197.com it had been published earlier, it was the titular story of Narayan's fourth collection of short stories published in by Indian Thought Publications.

It was the first chapter of the world famous collection of stories Malgudi Days which was later telecasted on television in. An Astrologer's Day is a thriller, suspense short story by author R. K. Narayan. While it had been published earlier, it was the titular story of Narayan's fourth collection of short stories published in by Indian Thought Publications.

If there is a An Astrologer's Day SparkNotes, Shmoop guide, or Cliff Notes, you can find a link to each study guide below.

Among the summaries and analysis available for An Astrologer's Day, there are 1 Full Study Guide, 1 Short Summary and 1 Book Review. In "An Astrologer's Day," the main character is an astrologer. This astrologer begins his work at midday on a street near a public park.

Critical Appreciation of the short story ‘An Astrologer’s Day by R.K.Narayan’

Vendors are all around the astrologer. An Astrologer's Day Characters R.

An Astrologer's Day Summary

K. Narayan This Study Guide consists of approximately 44 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of An Astrologer's Day.

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